Quick Lit

April 2020

I’ve been reading a lot lately, and not always feeling like I want to write a full review for each book read (or sometimes I just don’t have much to say about a book). So I was inspired by Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Quick Lit posts, as well as Hannah at So Obsessed With‘s monthly Quick Lit posts, and decided to do something similar as a way to briefly discuss the books I read in a month but don’t write full reviews for.

I read 15 books in April, which is actually less than I expected to read, but then I remembered that I spent about a week playing Animal Crossing non-stop and then it makes sense.

Anyway, I have reviewed/will be writing reviews for nine of those, so here are my thoughts on the rest.

White Elephant, Trish Harnetiaux (library) – 2⭐

I couldn’t get into this. I wasn’t interested in the characters, and thought the mystery was really predictable, which meant this wasn’t a very suspenseful or interesting read.

Rich People Problems, Kevin Kwan (library) – 3⭐

I really enjoyed this series, but this might not have been the best choice of reading material during a global pandemic. I thought the first two books in the series were really fun and escapist reading, but I found it really hard to care about everyone’s concerns here as it related to obscene wealth. I did enjoy getting to learn more about Nick’s grandma, Su Yi, and her life, and I think that gave the story enough emotional heft that I was able to eventually get into this one. I just wonder if I might have enjoyed it more if I’d read it sooner.

The Kingdom, Fuminori Nakamura, Kalau Almony (Trans.) (library) – 3⭐

This was a really interesting story and a quick read, but also strange and I’m not sure what I was supposed to get from it.

Strike Me Down, Mindy Mejia (library) – 2⭐

I thought the synopsis was really intriguing, but this just wasn’t for me.

The Homecoming, Andrew Pyper (owned) – 3⭐

This was fine, maybe closer to 2.5 stars than 3, because I liked the initial set up and there was some suspense and intrigue at the beginning, but then it was kind of downhill from there for me.

Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators, Ronan Farrow (owned) – 5⭐

This was such an intriguing, intense read. The subject matter was difficult, but the way Ronan Farrow tells the story is a big part of what made this book so compelling.

What have you been reading lately?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This